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Three-Dimensional Art Courses

Ceramics/Pottery 1

Students explore how space, mass, balance, and form combine to create aesthetic forms or utilitarian products and structures.  Instructional focus will be on ceramics and/or pottery.  Media may include, but are not limited to, clay and/or plaster, with consideration of the workability, durability, cost, and toxicity of the media used.  Student artists consider the relationship of scale (i.e., hand-held, human, monumental) through the use of positive and negative space or voids, volume, visual weight, and gravity to create low/high relief or freestanding structures for personal intentions or public places.  They explore sharp and diminishing detail, size, position, overlapping, visual pattern, texture, implied line, space, and plasticity, reflecting craftsmanship and quality in the surface and structural qualities of the completed art forms. Students in the ceramics and/or pottery art studio focus on use of safety procedures for process, media, and techniques. Student artists use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works.  This course incorporates hands-on activities, journaling, and consumption of art materials.

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Ceramics/Pottery 2

Students explore spatial relationships through the use of nonobjective, abstract, or representational forms, products, or structures.  Instructional focus should be on ceramics and/or pottery.  Processes and techniques for substitution may include, but are not limited to, wheel-thrown clay, glaze formulation and application.  Media may include, but are not limited to, clay and/or plaster with consideration of the workability, durability, cost, and toxicity of the media used. Ceramic and/or pottery artists experiment with and manipulate space-producing devices, including overlapping, transparency, interpenetration, vertical and horizontal axis, inclined planes, disproportionate scale, fractional or abstracted representation, and spatial properties of the structural art elements.  Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface and structural qualities of the completed art forms.  Students in the ceramics and/or pottery art studio focus on use of safety procedures for process, media, and techniques.  Student artists use an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal or group works. This course incorporates hands-on activities, journaling, and consumption of art materials.

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Portfolio Development: Three-Dimensional Design Honors (Level 3)

The purpose of this course is to work in a self-directed environment toward the development of a portfolio showing a body of their own work that visually explores a particular artistic concern, articulated and supported by a written artist's statement.  Artists may work in, but are not limited to, content in clay, wood, wire, glass, metal, jewelry, fabrics/fibers, fashion design, green design, industrial design, and/or objects for interior design or architecture that integrate 3-dimensional design issues in a purposeful way.  Students regularly reflect on aesthetics and art issues individually and as a group, and manipulate the structural elements of art and organizational principles of design to create 3-dimensional works of art that are progressively more innovative and representative of the student's artistic and cognitive growth. In keeping with the rigor expected in an accelerated setting, students’ portfolios show personal vision and artistic growth over time, mastery of visual art skills and techniques, and evidence of sophisticated analytical and problem-solving skills based on their structural, historical, and cultural knowledge.  Students are self-directed and display readiness for high levels of critical thinking, research, conceptual thinking, and creative risk-taking.  Participation in the Annual AP/Honors Art Exhibit, with artist statement, is an expectation of the course.  This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials. 

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Advanced Placement Studio Art: 3-D Design Portfolio (Level 4)

The purpose of this Advanced Placement course is to give an art student the opportunity to develop quality, concentration and breadth in the three-dimensional (3-D) design portfolio.  The content should include, but not be limited to, the experiences in the development of perceptual, conceptual and technical aspects of additive, subtractive, and/or fabrication process when creating sculptural or ceramic forms.  Preparation of the appropriate number of works, digital documentation and upload to The College Board site for portfolio evaluation, and presentation techniques are required in each of three portfolio sections to be evaluated by The College Board. Research analysis, sketchbook/journal, and aesthetic and historical criticism are required for this in-depth study in non-linear thinking.  Participation in the Annual AP/Honors Art Exhibit, with artist statement, is an expectation of the course.

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